German Haunebu and Vril Disc: The World’s First Flying Saucer

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In the summer of 1922 in a small barn outside of Munich the occult Thule and Vril Gesellschafts set about to create an interdimensional flight machine based upon channeled information received by their two mediums (Maria Orsich and Sigrun) from Aldeberan in the Taurus Constellation, 68 light years away.

Maria, the Thule medium, had been receiving information from what she believed was aliens living on Aldebaran since 1919 but could not translate their language and strange mental images. Sigrun, the Vril medium was brought in to help translate these communications and images which was in the form of a strange circular flight machine with an even stranger cylindrical powerplant beyond all conventional science of the time.

Thule and Vril secretly called this craft the Jenseitsflugmaschine, or “Other World Flight Machine”. The Gesellschafts then used their members in the German business community to raise funds for the construction of this machine under the code letters J-F-M.

Vril GesellschaftThe medium Maria Orsic was leader of the “Vrilerinnen”, the beautiful young ladies of the Vril Gesellschaft.

By 1922, parts for the machine began arriving independently from various industrial sources paid in full by the Thule and Vril Gesellschafts. The machine itself was a disc craft with three inner disc plates inside and a cylindrical power unit running through the center of all three plates. The central disc plate measured 8 meters in diameter; above it in parallel was a disc plate of 6.5 meters diameter and below an equally parallel disc of 7 meters diameter. Through the center of all three disc plates ran a 2.4 meter high cylindrical power unit that fit into a running 1.8 meter hole that culminated at the bottom of the disc body with a conical point to which was attached an enormous pendulum to stabilize the equipment once the unit was operating.

Once activated, the cylindrical power unit which consisted of an electric starter motor and high power generator started the upper and lower disc plates spinning in opposite directions to create a rotating electromagnetic field that was increasingly intensified. The intensity and frequency of the field oscillations increased in theory up to a point where an interdimensional oscillation occurred, opening a gateway or portal to another world. The occultists called this a “white hole” that theoretically would connect the JFM to Aldeberan’s corresponding frequency oscillations and navigate the machine through to that world. The sole purpose of this machine was to reach Aldeberan and make contact directly with those that had supplied the information through channeling.

JFM JenseitsflugmaschineJFM Jenseitsflugmaschine (Other World Flight Machine)

Two years of research was done with the JFM until 1924 when the machine was hurriedly dismantled and moved to Augsburg where it eventually was placed in storage at Messerschmitt’s facility. With the end of the war, no trace was ever found of the JFM. Perhaps it was destroyed in an Allied bombing raid or simply taken apart by the Germans themselves out of fear. No one is certain.

The Haunebu Disc

When Adolf Hitler became chancellor in Germany in 1933 the 11 year occult metaphysical science of Thule-Vril became strengthened by official state backing for the continued disc development programs starting with an RFZ (RundFlugZeug), or “Round Aircraft” series of discs that utilized levitators developed by W.O. Schumann of the Technical University of Munich who worked on the JFM.

Rundflugzeug RFZ-2 1937Rundflugzeug RFZ-2 (1937)

1934 saw the first RFZ discs built which led in five short years to two vast programs of highly advanced disc aircraft overseen by Himmler’s SS specifically, the SS technical branch Unit E-IV (Entwicklungsstelle 4) which was created to explore various alternative energies. This unit was tasked with developing both the Haunebu and Vril disc designs that utilized the world’s first electro-magnetic-gravitic drive systems: the Vril and Thule Triebwerks. These drives relied on Hans Coler’s free energy Konverter coupled to a Van De Graaf band generator and Marconi vortex dynamo (a huge spherical tank of mercury) to create powerful rotating electromagnetic fields that affected gravity.

Since 1935 the Thule Gesellschaft (Society) had been scouting for a remote, inconspicuous, underdeveloped testing ground for such a craft. Thule found a location in Northwest Germany that was known as (or possibly designated as) Hauneburg. At the establishment of this testing ground and facilities the SS E-IV unit simply referred to the new Thule disc as a war product- the “H-Gerat” (Hauneburg Device).

For wartime security reasons the name was shortened to Haunebu in 1939 and was briefly designated RFZ-5 along with Vril’s machines once the Hauneburg site was abandoned in favor of the more suitable Vril Arado Brandenburg aircraft testing grounds.

The early Haunebu I craft of which two prototypes were constructed were 25 meters in diameter, had a crew of eight and could achieve the incredible initial velocity of 4,800 km/h, but at low altitude. Further enhancement enabled the machine to reach 17,000 km/h.

Reichsflugscheiben Haunebu IReichsflugscheiben: Haunebu I

Flight endurance was 18 hours. To resist the incredible temperatures of these velocities a special armor called Victalen (Frozen Smoke) was pioneered by SS metallurgists specifically for both the Haunebu and Vril series of disc craft. The Haunebu I had a double hull of Victalen (Frozen Smoke developed in the 30’s).

Many have often inquired why then when war started in 1939 did Germany not use these advanced and unique machines in air combat? The simple truth lies in the fact that these machines, despite their superior overall performance to conventional piston-engined aircraft and early jets, could not be realistically adapted to any useful military role other than the most basic transport and recon work. The strong EM engines were difficult to control and could not hope to imitate the flight characteristics of high performance fighters like the Me BF 109 or Fw 190.

There was very little room for either offensive or defensive armament in these designs except for a few experimental light MG and MK cannons that proved impractical in flight and a rather large experimental Donar (Thunder) Kraftstrahlkanone (Strong Jet Cannon). These guns tended to destabilize the disc badly and were eventually removed. The disc bodies themselves were not capable of carrying any ordnance at all internally or externally (no bombs, unguided rockets, or missiles) and could only make turns of 22.5, 45, and 90 degrees.

Viktor Schauberge Repulsin A & B (1940-1945)

Viktor Schauberger, an Austrian forester who observed the effects of nature – especially of water, privately met Adolf Hitler in 1934 to discuss the fundamental principals of agriculture, forestry, and water engineering. Hitler was impressed by Schauberger’s radical ideas for utilizing water power in new and dynamic ways.

Viktor Schauberger

Viktor Schauberger (30 June 1885 in Holzschlag, Upper Austria – 25 September 1958 in Linz, Austria) was an Austrian forest caretaker, naturalist, pseudoscientist, philosopher, inventor and biomimicry experimenter. Schauberger developed his own ideas based on what he observed in nature.

In 1940, Schauberger began construction of the Repulsin(e) discoid motor in Vienna with help of the Kertl company. He patented his idea on March 4, 1940 in Austria under patent 146,141. Schauberger was then forced to work with Messerschmitt on liquid vortex cooling systems and Heinkel concerning applications of water towards aircraft engines. At this point Heinkel received reports on the early Repulsin A.

The construction and perfection of the Repulsin A model discoid motor continued until one of the early test models was ready for a laboratory test that ended in disaster. The model was 2.4 meters in diameter with a small high-speed electric motor. Upon initial start-up the Repulsin A was set in motion violently and rose vertically, quickly hitting the ceiling of the laboratory, shattering to pieces.

A year after the Repulsin Model A motor was being studied one of Heinkel’s own engineers named Rudolf Schriever proposed his own “Flugkreisel” (Flying Gyro) that utilized conventional jet engines instead of the Repulsin discoid motor. His design was taken from him and handed over to a team of scientists for further study and the construction of a large flying prototype. The team consisted of Dr. Richard Miethe, Klaus Habermohl, and an Italian – Dr. Guiseppe Belluzzo, who had come up with his own design for a jet powered round flying bomb – the Turboproietti.

Meanwhile, BMW started work on a design very similar to Schriever’s Flugkreisel but utilizing the company’s own BMW 003 jet engines. These machines, called “Flügelrads” (Winged Wheels) were not really true disc aircraft but jet autogyros that used a standard BMW 003 with a Strahlrohr (Jet pipe) deflector to power a multi-blade disc rotor. These craft were built on a much smaller scale than Schriever’s Flugkreisel so work proceeded from 1941-45 with construction of prototypes beginning in 1943. Instability, however, was never really solved in the earlier designs. One disc, however, a BMW Flügelrad II V-2 possibly achieved flight in April 1945.

BMW FlugelradBMW Flügelrad I V-2

Schriever’s own disc began to take shape in 1943 as well and flew under jet power provided by three attached special kerosene-burning jet engines driving the disc rotor as well as two kerosene jets on the body for forward thrust and horizontal stability. Flight characteristics were good but then the SS decided to abruptly drop Schriever’s jet-fan design in favor of Miethe’s version that eliminated the large disc rotor blades driven by jet engines for Schauberger’s liquid vortex engine, but on a larger scale.

At the same time a private venture with official backing from Air Ministry General Udet was taking shape in Leipzig. Arthur Sack who caught the attention of Udet way back in 1939 with his A.S.1 circular wing flying aero model was given permission and some funding to build a manned large-scale version of his model. Sack took up the challenge and built 4 more models of increasing size. When the A.S.5 demonstrated that the basic concept was sound construction began on the manned version in early 1944 – the A.S.6. Within a month the strange largely wooden aircraft utilizing salvaged parts from a ME BF 108 was taxiing and making attempts to fly. But this project was doomed from the start with an underpowered engine and plagued by structural problems which meant the aircraft could hop – but never fly.

Replacement models were built, but by 1943 a more improved design, the Repulsin B model was constructed with the SS objective of developing this motor for an odd SS bio-submarine which Schauberger named the “Forelle” (Trout) due to its configuration of a fish with a gaping mouth.

Operating Principle of Repulsin models

When the main electric engine is started, the Coanda effect begins to create a differential aerodynamic pressure between the outer and inner surface of the primary hull. At a higher speed, the vortex chamber becomes a type of high electrostatic generator due to the air particles, in high speed motion, acting as an electrical charge transporter. The Repulsin A will begin to glow due to strong ionization effect of the air. Now we have all the ingredients for a continuous and strong Aether flow along the main axis from the top to the bottom of the craft. The radial air pressure required for lifting 1 kg with the Coanda Effect is roughly 1.4 kg/cm2. In the Repulsin B the vortex turbine has been improved for increasing the “Implosion Effect” and thus the lifting force. In the Repulsin B the upper membrane is fixed and the lower rotates at high speed. On the edge rim there are special shaped blades of boomerang configuration. There are 120 blades that are 3 degrees spaced around the rim. The enhanced vortex turbine increases significantly the implosion effect in the vortex chamber. This contributes to it being able to generate a stronger thrust than the centrifugal turbine used in the Repulsin A. By means of suction screw-impeller (which revolved from the outside towards the inside along a cycloid, spiral space curve) the same type of force is generated which creates twisters, cyclones, and typhoons through the effect of either suction or implosion.Schauberger Repulsin technologyProposed VLX-2 Vortex Craft utilizing both Schauberger’s Repulsin technology and “Coanda Effect”

Work on the Repulsin B continued in 1944 at the Technical College of Engineering at Rosenhugel in Vienna. Schauberger was finally released back to Leonstein, Austria that same year. It appears that the SS had discarded the idea of applying the Schauberger motor to a submarine when the benefits would greatly improve their work on the secret Flugkreisel which was taken from Rudolf Schriever back in 1941. By 1943 the machine had flown but proved to be unstable. The leader of the SS replacement team was Dr. Richard Miethe who proposed several Flugkreisel replacements with varied power plants, most of which relied on jets or rocket power, until it was learned that Schauberger had engineered a type of turbine machine that would create an up-current of axially-spinning air so powerful that the up-current’s drag force would speed the whole machine higher and higher into the air with a thrust equal to 10,000 hp simply by moving air. The turbine was considered a priority for flight development into a manned machine by the SS. It is speculated that Miethe’s final design built in Breslau that flew in 1944 was an enlarged manned Repulsin-type craft.

Schauberger meanwhile had his remaining discoid motors confiscated by the Russians and Americans at the end of the war. While AVRO Canada approached Schauberger for disc development along with a team led by Dr. Richard Miethe, Schauberger refused and instead devoted his remaining life to peaceful uses of his vortex technology by working on various civilian projects which included generators, and both water and air purification systems. In the late 1950s Schauberger visited the US and was again pressured into working on military disc designs. The pressure was even greater due to the fact that Schauberger’s original Repulsin motors had fallen into Russian hands and the US suspected Schauberger’s technology would appear as a nuclear armed aircraft over US soil. Schauberger refused to participate again but had his designs forcibly signed over to a powerful US consortium. He returned to Austria and died there 5 months later having been robbed of everything.

Vril 1 “Jager” (Hunter)

The first purely Vril disc – the Vril 1 Jager (Hunter) was constructed in 1941 and first flew in 1942. It was 11.5 meters in diameter, had a single pilot, and could achieve 2,900 km/h – 12,000 km/h. It flew with a metal dome at first but subsequent test versions had a heavily reinforced glass dome and could seat two crew. Flight endurance was 5.5 hrs. It was planned to arm this craft with two MK-108 cannon plus 2 MG-17 machineguns. Seventeen of these craft were constructed and tested between 1942-44 with 84 test flights The Vril 2 Zerstorer (Destroyer) was a highly advanced oval shaped disc that was much too complex for the time period; thus it was projected for 1945/46, so no construction was started.

Vril 1 Jager HunterGerman Reichsflugscheiben: Vril 1 “Jager”

The Vril 3 and 4 have been photographed but no surviving information is found on them. Vrils 5 and 6 likewise do not show up and may have only been projects. The Vril 7 and 8, however, were constructed. The Vril 7 Geist (Ghost) was 45 meters in diameter and crewed by fourteen men. It was built in 1944 and tested at Arado-Brandenburg using Vril’s own Triebwerk. Vril’s medium Sigrun made frequent trips to the facility to oversee construction and testing. In 1944, Arado engineers approached her with a request. They wanted to know if the Vril Triebwerk could be adapted to one of their projects- the Arado E.555 strategic bomber. The Vril 1 had a single hull of this type, the Vril 7 two. The large Haunbeu III had three. With the SS supervising all aspects of the disc programs every model had to have at least theoretical provision for armament. In the Vril 7 Geist it would have been four MK-108 cannon. The Vril 8 Odin was the last official Vril disc that was flight tested in the spring of 1945 during the collapse. This disc had an automatic Oberon upward-firing gun installation on top of the control center.

Haunebu IIIPhotocopy of SS plans for a Haunebu III being designed in 1945

The Vril Gesellschaft had started evacuating to Base 211 in Neu Schwabenland Antarctica in March 1945 so it would seem like the Vril 8 Odin was the last Vril disc actually tested. However, some weeks after Germany surrendered both Haunebu and Vril craft were spotted in the skies over occupied Germany. Although the Vril 9 Abjager (Universal Hunter) was show as a design on paper, a craft identical to it was photographed postwar. Vril’s final plan was the construction of a large 139 meter long cylindrical Raumschiff known by the SS E-IV Unit as the Andromeda-Gerat. Work on this “flying cigar” was to commence in 1945 at a huge, sheltered above-ground Zeppelin-like hangar.

A short summary of the developments

The first project was led by Professor W.O. Schumann of the Technical University Munich. Under his guidance seventeen disk-shaped flying machines with a diameter of 11.5 m were built, the so-called VRIL-1-Jager (Vril-1 fighters), that made 84 test flights. At least one VRIL-7 and one VRIL-7 large capacity craft apparently started from Brandenburg – after the whole test area had been blown up – towards Aldebaran with some of the Vril scientists and Vril lodge members. The second project was run by the SS-W development group. Until the beginning of 1945 they had three different sizes of bell-shaped space gyros built: The Haunebu I, 25m diameter, two machines built that made 52 test flights (speed ca. 4,800 km/h).

The Haunebu II, 32m diameter, seven machines built that made 106 test flights (speed ca. 6,000 km/h). The Haunebu II was already planned for series production. Tenders were asked from the Dornier and Junkers aircraft manufacturers, and at the end of March 1945 the decision was made in favour of Dornier. The official name for the heavy craft was to be DO-STRA (Dornier Stratospehric craft).

Dornier stratospharenflugzeug Haunebu IIAt 85 feet diameter, the Haunebu II was only slightly larger than its predecessor and incorporated only minor improvements. Testing between 1942 and 1944 led to the development of the Haunebu II Do-Stra (Dornier Stratosphärenflugzeug: Dornier Stratospheric Aircraft).

The Haunebu III, 71m diameter, only one machine built that made at least 19 test flights (speed ca. 7,000 km/h). The ANDROMEDA DEVICE existed on the drawing board, it was 139m long and had hangars for one Haunebu II, two Vril I’s and two Vril II’s. There are documents showing that the VRIL 7 large capacity craft has started for secret, still earth-bound, missions after it was finished and test flown by the end of 1944: 1. A landing at the Mondsee in the Salzkammergut in Austria, with dives to test the pressure resistance of the hull. 2. Probably in March and April 1945 the VRIL 7 was stationed in the “Alpenfestung” (Alpine Fortress) for security and strategic reasons, from whence it flew to Spain to get important personalities who had fled there safely to South America and “Neuschwabenland” (New Swabia) to the secret German bases erected there during the war. 3. Immediately after this the VRIL 7 is said to have started on a secret flight to Japan about which however nothing further is known.

Vril Triebwerk EMG engines plus Schumann SM-Levitators

Links & Reference Sources

RFZ (Rundflugzeug) of the Thule-Vril type Series 1-7 (1937-1942)
Astonishing WW2 German Flying Disc Technology
BMW Flügelrad SERIES I-III (1943-1945)
The Aldebaran Mystery
VIKTOR SCHAUBERGER REPULSIN A & B
The HAUNEBU DISC
JFM JENSEITSFLUGMASCHINE (1922-1924)
Introduction to German Flying Discs: 1922 — 1945 and Beyond